Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.’27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer

Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer

Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Here is an extraordinarily rare (the only one I have ever seen) autographed photo of black Jazz Age pioneer. Cabaret singer, dancer, and comedian. Florence Mills from her prime in 1927, three months before her early death at the age of 31. Florence Mills, original name Florence Winfrey, born January 25, 1896, in or near Washington, D. Died November 1, 1927, New York City, New York, American singer and dancer, a leading performer during the Jazz Age and the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. She paved the way for African Americans in mainstream theatre and popularized syncopated dance and song. Born into poverty, Mills early demonstrated a talent for singing and dancing. Under the name “Baby Florence, ” she made her stage debut about age five. In 1903 her family moved to the Harlem district of New York City, and in 1910 she formed a traveling vaudeville act with her two older sisters. Her breakthrough came in 1921, when she landed the lead role in the Broadway musical Shuffle Along by Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle. The show was an instant hit, in large part because of Mills’s commanding stage presence. Though delicate in appearance, she mesmerized the audience with her uninhibited dance, hauntingly high voice, and flair for comedy. In 1922 she appeared in Plantation Revue on Broadway, and the following year she traveled to London to perform in From Dover to Dixie. The show was a success, playing in New York as From Dixie to Broadway (1924). Offered a role with the Ziegfeld Follies, Mills declined in order to start an all-Black revue. She took Blackbirds to London and Paris, but serious illness forced her return to America in 1927; she died late that year. Her funeral was attended by some 150,000 mourners. Rare early autograph of English actress Dorothy Ward on the reverse (under a photo of her). Dorothy Ward (1890 – 1987) was an English actress who specialized in pantomimes, playing the principal boy roles, while her husband Shaun Glenville would play the dame roles. She had a successful 52 year career and played in over 40 pantomimes between 1905 and 1957. Florence Mills (born Florence Winfrey; January 25, 1896 – November 1, 1927), billed as the “Queen of Happiness”, was an American cabaret singer, dancer, and comedian. A daughter of formerly enslaved parents, Nellie (Simon) and John Winfrey, she was born Florence Winfrey in 1896 in Washington, D. She began performing as a child. At the age of six she sang duets with her two older sisters, Olivia and Maude. They eventually formed a vaudeville act, calling themselves the Mills Sisters. The act did well, appearing in theaters along the Atlantic seaboard. Florence’s sisters eventually quit performing, but Florence stayed with it, determined to pursue a career in show business. She joined Ada Smith, Cora Green, and Carolyn Williams in the Panama Four, which had some success. Mills became well known in New York as a result of her role in the successful Broadway musical Shuffle Along (1921) at Daly’s 63rd Street Theatre (barely on Broadway), one of the events marking the beginning of the Harlem Renaissance. She received favorable reviews in London, Paris, Ostend, Liverpool, and other European venues. She told the press that despite her years in vaudeville, she credited Shuffle Along with launching her career. After Shuffle Along, Lew Leslie, a white promoter, hired Mills and Thompson to appear nightly at the Plantation Club. The revue featured Mills and a wide range of black artists, including visiting performers such as Paul Robeson. In 1922, Leslie turned the nightclub acts into a Broadway show, The Plantation Revue. It opened at the Forty-Eighth Street Theatre on July 22. The English theatrical impresario Charles B. Cochran brought the Plantation company to London, and they appeared at the London Pavilion in spring 1923 in a show he produced, Dover Street to Dixie, with a local all-white cast in the first half and Mills starring with the all-black Plantation cast in the second half. In 1924 she headlined at the Palace Theatre, the most prestigious booking in vaudeville, and became an international star with the hit show Lew Leslie’s Blackbirds (1926). Among her fans when she toured Europe was Edward, the then Prince of Wales, who told the press that he had seen Blackbirds 11 times. Many in the black press admired her popularity and saw her as a role model: not only was she a great entertainer but she was also able to serve as an ambassador of good will from the blacks to the whites… A living example of the potentialities of the Negro of ability when given a chance to make good. Mills was featured in Vogue and Vanity Fair and was photographed by Bassano’s studios and Edward Steichen. Her signature song was her biggest hit, “I’m a Little Blackbird Looking for a Bluebird”. Another of her hit songs was “I’m Cravin’ for that Kind of Love”. Exhausted from more than 300 performances of the hit show Blackbirds in London in 1926, she became ill with tuberculosis. She died of infection following an operation at the Hospital for Joint Diseases in New York City, New York on November 1, 1927. She was 31 years old. Most sources, including black newspapers, such as the Chicago Defender and the Pittsburgh Courier, and mainstream publications, including the New York Times and the Boston Globe, reported that she died of complications from appendicitis. Her death shocked the music world. The New York Times reported that more than 10,000 people visited the funeral home to pay their respects; thousands attended her funeral, including James Weldon Johnson, president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and stars of the stage, vaudeville and dance. Honorary pall bearers including singers Ethel Waters, Cora Green, and Lottie Gee, all of whom had performed with Mills. Dignitaries and political figures of both races sent their condolences. She is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, in the Bronx, New York. Her widower, Ulysses Thompson, a native of Prescott, Arkansas, was a dancer and comedian, having learned his trade in the tough world of circuses and traveling medicine shows in the early years of the century. He subordinated his career to hers, acting as her manager, promoter, minder and companion. After her death, he continued performing, traveling around the world, including appearances in China and Australia, until the late 1930s. He later married Gertrude Curtis, New York’s first black woman dentist (1911) and the widow of the lyricist Cecil Mack (born as Richard Cecil McPherson). Thompson outlived both of his wives; he died in 1990, at the age of 101, in Little Rock, Arkansas. Mills is credited with having been a staunch and outspoken supporter of equal rights for African Americans, with her signature song “I’m a Little Blackbird” being a plea for racial equality, and during her life she broke many racial barriers. After her death, Duke Ellington memorialized Mills in his composition Black Beauty. Fats Waller also memorialized Mills in a song, Bye Bye Florence, recorded in Camden, New Jersey, on November 14, 1927, featuring Bert Howell on vocals with organ by Waller; Florence was recorded with Juanita Stinette Chappell on vocals and Waller on organ. Other songs recorded the same day include You Live On in Memory and Gone but Not Forgotten-Florence Mills, neither of which were composed by Waller. English composer Constant Lambert – also a friend and champion of Duke Ellington – saw Florence Mills when she performed in Dover Street to Dixie at the London Pavilion in 1923, and again when she visited London a second time in 1926-7 for her show Blackbirds. On her death Lambert immediately wrote the piano piece Elegaic Blues in tribute, orchestrating it the following year. The rising triplet near the beginning (bar 8) is a quote from the fanfare that opened Blackbirds. The Florence Mills Theatre opened on 8 December 1930 at 3511 South Central Avenue, Los Angeles. The 740-seat theater was commissioned by Sam Kramer. On opening night almost 1,000 people lined the street, with 10 police officers holding back the crowds. A residential building at 267 Edgecombe Avenue in Harlem’s Sugar Hill neighborhood is named after her. A biography by Bill Egan entitled Florence Mills: Harlem: Jazz Queen was published in 2006, and a children’s book, Baby Flo: Florence Mills Lights Up the Stage, by Alan Schroeder, was published by Lee and Low in 2012. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Autographs-Original\Music\Jazz & Big Band”. The seller is “pengang” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Industry: Music

Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Photo d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer

Yao Ming signed autographed 8×10 Photo Extremely Rare Houston Rockets COA

Yao Ming signed autographed 8x10 Photo Extremely Rare Houston Rockets COA

Yao Ming signed autographed 8x10 Photo Extremely Rare Houston Rockets COA
The above is a hand signed 8×10 Photo of Yao Ming (Extremely Rare). Yao signed this photo at his NYC hotel in 2017 during a promotional trip. The above photo has been certified by Beckett Authentication Services (BAS) and comes with a matching certificate of authenticity. ABOUT ME : I have been collecting IN PERSON autographs for the last 20 years, the last 8 taking place in NYC. Living in NYC has enabled me to attend many celebrity events such as TV Tapings, Film Sets, Movie Premieres, Celebrity Hotels, and Other events. I stand behind every autograph 100% and do not obtain items from 3rd Parties as other sellers often do. Please feel free to contact me if you have any additional questions regarding the item for sale. This item is in the category “Collectibles\Autographs\Celebrities”. The seller is “nycinpersongraphs” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, Korea, South, Indonesia, Taiwan, South Africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Republic of, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei Darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French Guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman Islands, Liechtenstein, Sri Lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macau, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Vietnam, Uruguay.
Yao Ming signed autographed 8x10 Photo Extremely Rare Houston Rockets COA

Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed

Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed
Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed
Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed
Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed
Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed
Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed
Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed
Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed
Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed
Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed

Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed
Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing. Original Hand Drawn Sketch. This Drawing is Inscribed to his Friend Leo Fonarow who was in the Hospital, Chuck Jones Drew This Risque Comical Scene For Him Which Reads: No- I don’t know what’s the matter with him But I can sure as heck tell you what isnt the matter with him! Chuck added a note on the bottom that reads: Hi Leo! – Some people have all the luck– but being in the hospital doesnt qualify you as one of them! All Written out in Chuck Jones’s Hand All in Pencil. Comes with a Full Letter of Authenticity from JSA James Spence Authentication. Original Drawing Size 9″ x 12″. Custom Framed Size 18″ x 20″. Overall in Nice Condition. Very Rare Drawing From the Animator Who Has Drawn Bugs Bunny. Newly Museum Quality Custom Framed. Custom Framed in a 1 gloss black arcade. Frame, triple matted with gray licorice linen outer mat, red and black suede inner matting. Matted into the display is a metal engraved description plaque. 100% acid free matting to museum quality. Enclosed in museum glass 99% UV protection to keep the art from fading. Dust covered backed, wired ready for hanging. The photographs do this piece zero justice, it is absolutely gorgeous! We guarantee if you are not 100% happy with any of our items. Long Island Picture Frame & Art Gallery has been in business for over 25 years. We are leaders in the custom framing industry. Every piece that we custom frame is met with museum quality standards. Compare our quality to our competitors. Take notice of the detail in the custom framing that we offer, we DO NOT use store bought ready-made frames. Each piece is custom designed by a qualified framer each frame and matting is carefully selected and designed to complement the piece. Available on All of our Items! We also can Custom Frame Your Items! This item is in the category “Collectibles\Animation Art & Merchandise\Animation Art”. The seller is “lipfob” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada.
  • Character: Bugs Bunny
  • Animation Studio: Chuck Jones
  • Theme: Animation
  • Inscribed: Yes
  • Type: Drawing, Sketch
  • Title: Bugs Bunny
  • Features: Certificate of Authenticity Included, Framed, Matted
  • Illustrator: Chuck Jones
  • Autograph Format: Hard Signed
  • Artwork Type: Original
  • Signed: Yes
  • Signed By: Chuck Jones
  • Tradition: Western Animation
  • Brand: Warner Bros.
  • Original/Licensed Reproduction: Original
  • Era: 1970-Now
  • Franchise: Warner Bros

Original Drawing by Chuck Jones Extremely Rare & Risque Drawing Custom Framed

1985 Russell Chatham Hand Writen Letter Signed Original Extremely RARE

1985 Russell Chatham Hand Writen Letter Signed Original Extremely RARE
1985 Russell Chatham Hand Writen Letter Signed Original Extremely RARE
1985 Russell Chatham Hand Writen Letter Signed Original Extremely RARE
1985 Russell Chatham Hand Writen Letter Signed Original Extremely RARE
1985 Russell Chatham Hand Writen Letter Signed Original Extremely RARE

1985 Russell Chatham Hand Writen Letter Signed Original Extremely RARE
Original Extremely RARE Russell Chatham Hand Writen Letter to Lover Christmas 1985. This item is in the category “Art\Art Prints”. The seller is “jremy14″ and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, Sweden, Korea, South, Indonesia, Taiwan, South Africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Norway, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Republic of, Malaysia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint Kitts-Nevis, Saint Lucia, Montserrat, Turks and Caicos Islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei Darussalam, Bolivia, Egypt, French Guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman Islands, Liechtenstein, Sri Lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macau, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Uruguay.
  • Artist: Russell Chatham
  • Signed By: Russell Chatham
  • Signed: Signed
  • Date of Creation: 1985
  • Material: Paper
  • Original/Licensed Reprint: Original
  • Subject: Rare letter, Landscape
  • Print Surface: Paper
  • Listed By: Private
  • Framed/Unframed: Unframed
  • Type: Hand Writen
  • Year of Production: 1985
  • Original/Reproduction: Original Print
  • Theme: letter
  • Style: love
  • Features: Signed
  • Production Technique: hand written
  • Print Type: Hand writen

1985 Russell Chatham Hand Writen Letter Signed Original Extremely RARE

Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.’25 1st Film Star Chaplin

Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin

Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin
The only one I have ever come across. Considered to be the world’s first film star, one of the greatest of all silent comics, and an inspiration to Charlie Chaplin and other silent and sound comics. Although all too frequently neglected by fans of silent comedy, Max Linder is in many ways as important a figure as Charles Chaplin, Buster Keaton or Harold Lloyd, not least because he predated (and influenced) them all by several years and was largely responsible for the creation of the classic style of silent slapstick comedy. Linder started out as an actor in the French theatre, but after making his screen debut in 1905 he quickly became an enormously famous and successful film comedian on both sides of the Atlantic, thanks to his character “Max, ” a top-hatted dandy. By 1912 he was the highest-paid film star in the world, with an unprecedented salary of one million francs. He began to direct films in 1911 and showed equal facility behind the camera, but his career suffered an almost terminal blow when he was drafted into the French army to fight in World War I. He was gassed, and the illness that resulted would blight his career. Although offered a contract in America, recurring ill health meant that his US films had little of the sparkle of his early French work, and a brief attempt to revive his career by making films for the recently-formed United Artists (one of whose founders, of course, was Chaplin) in the early 1920s came to little, although these later films are now regarded as classics. Pasted to a scrapbook page. On the reverse is an autographed photo of a French singer from that time, Jane Varenne. His onscreen persona “Max” was one of the first recognizable recurring characters in film. He has also been cited as the “first international movie star” and “the first film star anywhere”. Born in Cavernes, France to Catholic parents, Linder grew up with a passion for theater and enrolled in the Conservatoire de Bordeaux in 1899. He soon received awards for his performances and continued to pursue a career in the legitimate theater. He became a contract player with the Bordeaux Théâtre des Arts from 1901 to 1904, performing in plays by Molière, Pierre Corneille, and Alfred de Musset. From the summer of 1905, Linder appeared in short comedy films for Pathé, at first usually in supporting roles. His first major film role was in the Georges Méliès-like fantasy film The Legend of Punching. During the following years, Linder made several hundred short films portraying “Max”, a wealthy and dapper man-about-town frequently in hot water because of his penchant for beautiful women and the good life. Starting with The Skater’s Debut in 1907, the character became one of the first identifiable motion-picture characters who appeared in successive situation comedies. By 1911, Linder was co-directing his own films (with René LePrince) as well as writing the scripts. Linder enlisted at the outbreak of the First World War, and worked at first as a dispatch driver and entertainer. During his service, he was injured several times, and the experiences reportedly had a devastating effect on him both physically and mentally. It was during this time he suffered his first outbreak of chronic depression. In 1899, Linder enrolled in the Conservatoire de Bordeaux and quickly won awards for first prize in comedy and second prize in tragedy. He continued to pursue a career in the theater and became a contract player with the Bordeaux Théâtre des Arts from 1901 to 1904, performing in plays by Molière, Pierre Corneille and Alfred de Musset. At the same time that he was performing in serious dramatic theater, he became friends with Charles le Bargy of the Comédie-Française. Le Bargy encouraged Linder to audition for the Conservatoire de Paris in 1904. Linder was rejected and began appearing in less prestigious theaters such as the Olympia Theater and the Théâtre de l’Ambigu. By 1905, he had adopted his stage name of Max Linder and used it in several theatrical performances. Also during this period, Linder applied for work at Pathé Frères in Vincennes at the suggestion of film director Louis Gasnier and began appearing in small bit parts, mostly in slapstick comedies. Linder continued to appear on the stage for the next two years and was not a significant film star at first. However, an often-told legend about the origins of Linder’s film career is that French film producer Charles Pathé personally saw Linder on the stage and wrote him a note that read In your eyes lies a fortune. Come and act in front of my cameras, and I will help make it. From 1905 to 1907, Linder appeared in dozens of short comedy films for Pathé, usually in a supporting role. His first noticeably larger film role was in The Young Man’s First Outing in 1905. He also appeared in Georges Méliès-like fantasy films such as Serpentine Dances and The Legend of Punching, his first leading role. His rise to stardom commenced in 1907 when Pathé’s slapstick star René Gréhan left the company to join Éclair. Gréhan’s screen character was Gontran, whose persona included high-society clothing and a dandy-ish demeanor. ” Linder made more than one hundred short films portraying “Max, a wealthy and dapper man-about-town frequently in hot water because of his penchant for beautiful women and the good life. With this character, he had created one of the first identifiable motion-picture characters who appeared in successive situation comedies. Linder’s first appearance as “Max” was in The Skater’s Debut in 1907. Lake Daumesnil in Paris had frozen over and director Louis Gasnier filmed Linder in his new attire, with Linder improvising the rest. In the film, “Max” falls about and does a rendition of “the windmill routine” by spinning his cane around, predating Charlie Chaplin’s version in The Rink by nine years. Pathé was unimpressed with the film and re-shot parts of it, and it was not popular with audiences when released. Soon afterwards, Gasnier left Pathé and moved to Italy, leaving Linder without a supporter at Pathé; he made few films in 1908. His luck began to change when Pathé’s top comedy star, André Deed, left to work with the Italian film company Itala, leaving Linder as the company’s leading comedic actor. The team made several shorts in 1909 with Linder in various roles, such as a blind elderly man and a coquettish young woman. But they soon discovered that the character of “Max” was the most popular with audiences and stuck with him from then on. Among the popular “Max” films made by Linder and Grasnier in 1909 are A Young Lady Killer and The Cure for Cowardice. By 1910, Linder had proved himself to Pathé and was quickly becoming one of the most popular film actors in the world. When Gasnier was sent to the United States later that year to oversee Pathé’s productions there, Lucien Nonguet took over as Linder’s director. Together they made such films as Max Takes a Bath and the autobiographical Max Linder’s Film Debut, which fictitiously recreates the legend of Linder’s early film career and includes Charles Pathé as himself. By the end of the year, Linder had become the most popular film actor in the world. Although actress Florence Lawrence is often referred to as “The First Movie Star” in the United States, Linder appears to be the very first worldwide movie star with a major following. In Russia, he was voted the most popular film actor, ahead of Asta Nielsen. He also had a Russian impersonator, Zozlov, and a devoted fan in Czar Nicholas II. Another professed fan was British playwright George Bernard Shaw. The first feature film ever made in Bulgaria was a remake of one of Linder’s earlier movies. In France, a Max Linder movie theater had opened in Paris. At the height of his fame, Linder ended 1910 with a serious illness. He was forced to stop making films when appendicitis left him bedridden, and some newspapers reported that he had died. He eventually recovered the following spring and began making films again in May 1911. By 1912, he was the solo director of his films. Gaining complete control over his own films brought positive results both critically and commercially; the films Linder made during this period are generally considered to be his best. Max, Victim of Quinine is considered by film critic Jean Mitry to be his masterpiece. “[8] In the film, an intoxicated “Max gets into numerous fights with such dignitaries as the Minister of War, an ambassador and the police commissioner, all of whom challenge him to a duel and present him with their business cards. Eventually “Max” is apprehended by the police, who attempt to return him to his residence, but end up mistakenly taking him to the homes of the various men whom he had previously fought with. The universality of silent films brought Linder fame and fortune throughout Europe, making him the highest paid entertainer of the day, with a salary increase of 150,000 francs (the average monthly salary in France was 100 francs at the time). He began touring Europe with his films from 1911 to 1912, including Spain, where he entertained thousands of fans at the Barcelona railway station, Austria, and Russia, where he was accompanied on piano by a young Dimitri Tiomkin. In 1912 after the tour, Linder demanded and received a salary of one million francs a year, and Charles Pathé used the huge sum to generate publicity, with an ad reading We understand that the shackles which bind Max Linder have attained the value of one million francs a year… The imagination boggles at such a figure! ” This set a precedent in the entertainment industry for actors’ salaries that would become a staple of the Hollywood system, but privately Pathé nicknamed Linder “The Napoleon of the Cinema. The high point of Linder’s career was from 1912 to 1914. His films were made with increased skill and “Max” was at his funniest. He made such films as Max Virtuoso, Max Does Not Speak English, Max and His Dog, Max’s Hat and Max and the Jealous Husband. His ensemble of actors included Stacia Napierkowska, Jane Renouardt, Gaby Morlay, and occasional performances from the young actors Abel Gance and Maurice Chevalier. Linder had given Chevalier his start in movies, but the silent medium did not suit Chevalier, who stuck to the stage until the all-singing all-dancing features came in, many years later. The outbreak of World War I brought a temporary end to Linder’s film career in 1914, but not before he made the short patriotic film The Second of August that year. Linder attempted to enlist in the French army, but was physically unfit for combat duty. Instead he worked as a dispatch driver between Paris and the front lines. Many conflicting stories about the reasons behind his dismissal from the army exist, including that he was shot through the lung, and seriously wounded. Initially, it was reported by one newspaper that he had been killed; Linder actually phoned the offending publishers, leading them to run the headline “Max Linder Not Killed”. However, others have asserted that he became infected with pneumonia after hiding from a German patrol in icy water for several hours. It was also during this period that Linder suffered his first serious bout with chronic depression. In 1916, Linder was approached by American film producer George K. Linder was offered a new contract from Charles Pathé, but accepted Spoor’s offer and moved to the United States to work for Essanay later that year. Unfortunately his first few American-made “Max” films were unpopular both critically and financially. The first two, Max Comes Across and Max Wants a Divorce were complete failures, but the third film, Max and his Taxi was moderately successful. The financially troubled studio may have been counting on Linder to restore its flagging fortunes and cancelled production of the remaining films on Linder’s contract. Max and his Taxi had been shot in Hollywood and while there Linder had developed a close friendship with Charlie Chaplin. They would often attend events such as boxing matches or car races together, and according to writer Jack Spears, while working on a picture Linder would go next door to Chaplin’s home and discuss the day’s shooting. The two often sat until dawn, developing and refining the gags. Chaplin’s suggestions were invaluable, Linder said. However, due to his depression and anxiety about the still ongoing war, he was unable to continue making films on a regular basis, and was often quoted by journalists about the horrors of the front lines. After the Armistice in 1918, Linder was able to regain his enthusiasm and agreed to make a film with director Raymond Bernard, the feature length The Little Café in 1919. In the film, Linder plays a waiter who suddenly becomes a millionaire, but simultaneously is tricked into a twenty-year contract to be a waiter by the cafe owner. The film made over a million francs in Europe and briefly revived his career, but was financially unsuccessful in the US. Four years after failing to become a major star in the U. Linder made another attempt at filmmaking in Hollywood and formed his own production company there in 1921. His first film back in the U. Was Seven Years Bad Luck, considered by some to be his best film. The film contains one of the earliest examples on film of the “human mirror” gag best known in the scene between Groucho and Harpo Marx in Duck Soup twelve years later. Linder next made Be My Wife later that year, but again neither films were able to find a major audience in the U. Linder then decided to dispense with the “Max” character and try something different for his third (and final) attempt: The Three Must-Get-Theres in 1922. The film is a satire of swashbuckling films made by Douglas Fairbanks and is loosely based on the plot of Alexander Dumas’ The Three Musketeers. The film was praised by Fairbanks and Charlie Chaplin, but again failed at the box office. At the films premiere, Linder had said to director Robert Florey You see, Bob, I sense that I’m no longer funny; I have so many preoccupations that I can no longer concentrate on my film character… The public is mildly amused by my situations, but this evening where were the explosions of laughter that we hear when Charlie’s on the screen? … Make people laugh, its easy to say make people laugh, but I don’t feel funny anymore. For director Abel Gance. The film is essentially a horror film set in a haunted house, with occasional moments of comedy by Linder. Linder’s last film was The King of the Circus directed by Édouard-Émile Violet (with pre-production collaboration from Jacques Feyder) and filmed in Vienna in 1925. In the film, “Max” joins a circus in order to be closer to the woman that he loves. The film includes such gags as a hungover “Max” waking up in a department store and the film’s plot is similar to the Charlie Chaplin film The Circus (1928). In late 1925, Linder was working on pre-production for his next film Barkas le fol, which would never be made. As a consequence of his war service, Linder suffered from continuing health problems, including bouts of severe depression and several mental breakdowns. It has been said that he evoked “tantrum-like appearances at the studio”. Director Édouard-Émile Violet recalled that Linder seemed invariably unstable, worried… Linder also became a heavy user of opium in the 1920s, which could have further harrowed his mind. During his war service, Linder was involved in a car accident; he was thrown out of the vehicle and badly injured. In early April 1923, Linder was involved in a second near fatal car accident in Nice, which resulted in a head injury. He was arrested in Nice later that month for “kidnapping a minor”, who happened to be his future wife, the seventeen-year-old Hélène “Ninette” Peters. They had planned to run away to Monte Carlo. Upon Linder and Peters’ first encounter at a hotel in Chamonix, Linder was entranced by her, exclaiming to a friend, I spent the whole night in a hotel lounge talking to the most extraordinary girl I could ever imagine. Instantly I knew this to be the woman in my life. They married on 2 August 1923 at the Parisian church of St. The two lived in an apartment at 11 Bis Avenue Émile Deschanel. Linder is said to have been a fiercely jealous and mentally abusive husband. He would often accuse his young wife of being unfaithful and threaten to “end her”. Whenever he went to town alone in the evenings, he would call her to make sure that she had not gone out without his consent. Linder and his wife may have made a suicide pact. On 24 February 1924, they were both found unconscious at a hotel in Vienna, Austria, though this was explained as an accidental overdose of sleeping powder. The incident was covered up by the physician reporting it as an accidental overdose of barbiturates[citation needed]. In late October 1925, Max and Hélène reportedly attended a Paris screening of Quo Vadis (in which the main characters, as a reporter put it, “bleed themselves to death”), and died in a similar manner. They drank Veronal, injected morphine and slashed their wrists. [8][18] Peters died first, while Linder was unconscious throughout 31 October, with doctors fighting to keep him alive. He died after midnight on 1 November. There is still some question, however, as to whether the deaths were really a result of a suicide pact, or whether Max murdered his much-younger wife or pressured her into killing herself. On 2 November 1925, The New York Times reported that Hélène Linder had told her mother by letter that, He will kill me. ” The article also claims that “no one believes she herself opened her veins. ” Critic Vincent Canby acknowledged in 1988 that “Linder died with his young wife in what has sometimes been described as a suicide pact, and sometimes as a murder-suicide. In addition, Maud Linder reported in her memoir that the head of the workmen at Linder’s house in Neuilly overheard Max tell a friend, probably Armand Massard, that he planned to kill his wife along with himself, as he could not bear the thought of her belonging to another after he was gone. Linder was buried at the Catholique cimetière de Saint-Loubès. His wife is buried at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris. Upon receiving the news of Linder’s death, Chaplin is reported to have closed his studio for one day out of respect. In the ensuing years, Linder was relegated to little more than a footnote in film history until 1963 when a Max Linder compilation film titled Laugh with Max Linder premiered at the Venice Film Festival and was theatrically released. The film was a compilation of Linder’s last three films made in Hollywood and its release was supervised by his daughter, Maud Linder. In 1983, Maud Linder made a documentary film, The Man in the Silk Hat, about Linder’s life and career. [8] It was screened out of competition at the 1983 Cannes Film Festival. In 1992, Maud Linder published a book about Linder in France, Max Linder was my father and in 2008 she received the Prix Henri Langlois for her work to promote her father’s legacy. In his honor, Lycée Max Linder, a public school in the city of Libourne in the Gironde département near his birthplace was given his name in 1981. Linder’s influence on film comedy and particularly on slapstick films is that the genre shifted from the “knockabout” comedies made by such people as Mack Sennett and André Deed to a more subtle, refined and character driven medium that would later be dominated by Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd, and others. Linder’s influence on Chaplin is apparent both from Chaplin’s sometimes borrowing gags or entire plot-lines from Linder’s films, as well as from a famous signed photo that Chaplin sent Linder which read: To Max, the Professor, from his disciple, Charlie Chaplin. Mack Sennett and King Vidor also singled out Linder as a great influence on their directing careers. His high society characterizations as “Max” also influenced such actors as Adolphe Menjou and Raymond Griffith. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Autographs-Original\Movies\Photographs”. The seller is “pengang” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Object Type: Photograph
  • Industry: Movies

Max Linder Extremely Rare Autographed Photo 1913 d.'25 1st Film Star Chaplin

Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque

Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque

Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque
Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque. This item is in the category “Art\Art Posters”. The seller is “man-cave-and-more” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Features: Framed, Signed
  • Subject: Musical Bands & Groups
  • Style: Vintage, 3D
  • Theme: Music
  • Type: 3D Plaque

Vintage Extremely Rare Cinderella Band 1990 Signed By Artist Framed 3D Plaque

Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Page d.’27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer

Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Page d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Page d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Page d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Page d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Page d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer

Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Page d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer
Here is an extraordinarily rare autographed page by black Jazz Age pioneer. Cabaret singer, dancer, and comedian. Florence Mills from her prime in 1927, three months before her early death at the age of 31. Beneath her signature she added the name of her most famous revue and song, Black Birds. Florence Mills, original name Florence Winfrey, born January 25, 1896, in or near Washington, D. Died November 1, 1927, New York City, New York, American singer and dancer, a leading performer during the Jazz Age and the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. She paved the way for African Americans in mainstream theatre and popularized syncopated dance and song. Born into poverty, Mills early demonstrated a talent for singing and dancing. Under the name “Baby Florence, ” she made her stage debut about age five. In 1903 her family moved to the Harlem district of New York City, and in 1910 she formed a traveling vaudeville act with her two older sisters. Her breakthrough came in 1921, when she landed the lead role in the Broadway musical Shuffle Along by Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle. The show was an instant hit, in large part because of Mills’s commanding stage presence. Though delicate in appearance, she mesmerized the audience with her uninhibited dance, hauntingly high voice, and flair for comedy. In 1922 she appeared in Plantation Revue on Broadway, and the following year she traveled to London to perform in From Dover to Dixie. The show was a success, playing in New York as From Dixie to Broadway (1924). Offered a role with the Ziegfeld Follies, Mills declined in order to start an all-Black revue. She took Blackbirds to London and Paris, but serious illness forced her return to America in 1927; she died late that year. Her funeral was attended by some 150,000 mourners. Rare early autograph of English actress Dorothy Ward on the reverse (under a photo of her). Dorothy Ward (1890 – 1987) was an English actress who specialized in pantomimes, playing the principal boy roles, while her husband Shaun Glenville would play the dame roles. She had a successful 52 year career and played in over 40 pantomimes between 1905 and 1957. Florence Mills (born Florence Winfrey; January 25, 1896 – November 1, 1927), billed as the “Queen of Happiness”, was an American cabaret singer, dancer, and comedian. A daughter of formerly enslaved parents, Nellie (Simon) and John Winfrey, she was born Florence Winfrey in 1896 in Washington, D. She began performing as a child. At the age of six she sang duets with her two older sisters, Olivia and Maude. They eventually formed a vaudeville act, calling themselves the Mills Sisters. The act did well, appearing in theaters along the Atlantic seaboard. Florence’s sisters eventually quit performing, but Florence stayed with it, determined to pursue a career in show business. She joined Ada Smith, Cora Green, and Carolyn Williams in the Panama Four, which had some success. Mills became well known in New York as a result of her role in the successful Broadway musical Shuffle Along (1921) at Daly’s 63rd Street Theatre (barely on Broadway), one of the events marking the beginning of the Harlem Renaissance. She received favorable reviews in London, Paris, Ostend, Liverpool, and other European venues. She told the press that despite her years in vaudeville, she credited Shuffle Along with launching her career. After Shuffle Along, Lew Leslie, a white promoter, hired Mills and Thompson to appear nightly at the Plantation Club. The revue featured Mills and a wide range of black artists, including visiting performers such as Paul Robeson. In 1922, Leslie turned the nightclub acts into a Broadway show, The Plantation Revue. It opened at the Forty-Eighth Street Theatre on July 22. The English theatrical impresario Charles B. Cochran brought the Plantation company to London, and they appeared at the London Pavilion in spring 1923 in a show he produced, Dover Street to Dixie, with a local all-white cast in the first half and Mills starring with the all-black Plantation cast in the second half. In 1924 she headlined at the Palace Theatre, the most prestigious booking in vaudeville, and became an international star with the hit show Lew Leslie’s Blackbirds (1926). Among her fans when she toured Europe was Edward, the then Prince of Wales, who told the press that he had seen Blackbirds 11 times. Many in the black press admired her popularity and saw her as a role model: not only was she a great entertainer but she was also able to serve as an ambassador of good will from the blacks to the whites… A living example of the potentialities of the Negro of ability when given a chance to make good. Mills was featured in Vogue and Vanity Fair and was photographed by Bassano’s studios and Edward Steichen. Her signature song was her biggest hit, “I’m a Little Blackbird Looking for a Bluebird”. Another of her hit songs was “I’m Cravin’ for that Kind of Love”. Exhausted from more than 300 performances of the hit show Blackbirds in London in 1926, she became ill with tuberculosis. She died of infection following an operation at the Hospital for Joint Diseases in New York City, New York on November 1, 1927. She was 31 years old. Most sources, including black newspapers, such as the Chicago Defender and the Pittsburgh Courier, and mainstream publications, including the New York Times and the Boston Globe, reported that she died of complications from appendicitis. Her death shocked the music world. The New York Times reported that more than 10,000 people visited the funeral home to pay their respects; thousands attended her funeral, including James Weldon Johnson, president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and stars of the stage, vaudeville and dance. Honorary pall bearers including singers Ethel Waters, Cora Green, and Lottie Gee, all of whom had performed with Mills. Dignitaries and political figures of both races sent their condolences. She is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery, in the Bronx, New York. Her widower, Ulysses Thompson, a native of Prescott, Arkansas, was a dancer and comedian, having learned his trade in the tough world of circuses and traveling medicine shows in the early years of the century. He subordinated his career to hers, acting as her manager, promoter, minder and companion. After her death, he continued performing, traveling around the world, including appearances in China and Australia, until the late 1930s. He later married Gertrude Curtis, New York’s first black woman dentist (1911) and the widow of the lyricist Cecil Mack (born as Richard Cecil McPherson). Thompson outlived both of his wives; he died in 1990, at the age of 101, in Little Rock, Arkansas. Mills is credited with having been a staunch and outspoken supporter of equal rights for African Americans, with her signature song “I’m a Little Blackbird” being a plea for racial equality, and during her life she broke many racial barriers. After her death, Duke Ellington memorialized Mills in his composition Black Beauty. Fats Waller also memorialized Mills in a song, Bye Bye Florence, recorded in Camden, New Jersey, on November 14, 1927, featuring Bert Howell on vocals with organ by Waller; Florence was recorded with Juanita Stinette Chappell on vocals and Waller on organ. Other songs recorded the same day include You Live On in Memory and Gone but Not Forgotten-Florence Mills, neither of which were composed by Waller. English composer Constant Lambert – also a friend and champion of Duke Ellington – saw Florence Mills when she performed in Dover Street to Dixie at the London Pavilion in 1923, and again when she visited London a second time in 1926-7 for her show Blackbirds. On her death Lambert immediately wrote the piano piece Elegaic Blues in tribute, orchestrating it the following year. The rising triplet near the beginning (bar 8) is a quote from the fanfare that opened Blackbirds. The Florence Mills Theatre opened on 8 December 1930 at 3511 South Central Avenue, Los Angeles. The 740-seat theater was commissioned by Sam Kramer. On opening night almost 1,000 people lined the street, with 10 police officers holding back the crowds. A residential building at 267 Edgecombe Avenue in Harlem’s Sugar Hill neighborhood is named after her. A biography by Bill Egan entitled Florence Mills: Harlem: Jazz Queen was published in 2006, and a children’s book, Baby Flo: Florence Mills Lights Up the Stage, by Alan Schroeder, was published by Lee and Low in 2012. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Autographs-Original\Music\Jazz & Big Band”. The seller is “pengang” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Industry: Music

Florence Mills Extremely Rare Autographed Page d.'27 Black Jazz Age Pioneer

Extremely Rare Mistel Cacao Signed Pro Wrestling Mask

Extremely Rare Mistel Cacao Signed Pro Wrestling Mask
Extremely Rare Mistel Cacao Signed Pro Wrestling Mask
Extremely Rare Mistel Cacao Signed Pro Wrestling Mask
Extremely Rare Mistel Cacao Signed Pro Wrestling Mask
Extremely Rare Mistel Cacao Signed Pro Wrestling Mask

Extremely Rare Mistel Cacao Signed Pro Wrestling Mask
*All items are shown in the pictures. *Due to differences in region codes, some games, CDs, DVDs, etc. May not be available. *The voltage of some electrical products may be different. *Please make sure to check before purchasing. International Buyers – Please Note. *The act of declaring goods at a lower value or declaring “goods” as “gifts” is prohibited by international governments. This item is in the category “Sports Mem, Cards & Fan Shop\Fan Apparel & Souvenirs\Wrestling”. The seller is “jp-shop2018″ and is located in this country: JP. This item can be shipped to United States, all countries in continental Asia, Canada, United Kingdom, Mexico, Australia.
  • Country: Japan
  • Sport: Wrestling
  • UPC: NA

Extremely Rare Mistel Cacao Signed Pro Wrestling Mask

Yvonne Craig Extremely Rare Very Early Original Autographed Photo 1950’s Batgirl

Yvonne Craig Extremely Rare Very Early Original Autographed Photo 1950's Batgirl
Yvonne Craig Extremely Rare Very Early Original Autographed Photo 1950's Batgirl
Yvonne Craig Extremely Rare Very Early Original Autographed Photo 1950's Batgirl
Yvonne Craig Extremely Rare Very Early Original Autographed Photo 1950's Batgirl
Yvonne Craig Extremely Rare Very Early Original Autographed Photo 1950's Batgirl
Yvonne Craig Extremely Rare Very Early Original Autographed Photo 1950's Batgirl
Yvonne Craig Extremely Rare Very Early Original Autographed Photo 1950's Batgirl

Yvonne Craig Extremely Rare Very Early Original Autographed Photo 1950's Batgirl
Here is a stunning exceptionally rare very early vintage original autographed 5″ by 7″ photo of actress Yvonne Craig from the 1950s, direct from a 1950s scrapbook. Yvonne Joyce Craig was born on May 16, 1937 in Taylorville, Illinois. As a young teenager, Yvonne showed such promise as a dancer that she was accepted to Denham’s Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. Her training progressed until she left the company in 1957 over a disagreement on casting changes. She moved to Los Angeles hoping to continue her dancing, but was soon cast in movies. At first, Yvonne had small roles in movies such as Gidget (1959) and The Gene Krupa Story (1959). After that, her film career just bumped along. As Yvonne was dating Elvis Presley at the time, she did have a supporting role in the two Elvis movies, It Happened at the World’s Fair (1963) and Kissin’ Cousins (1964). But her fame would come with the cult television series Batman (1966) in which she played Commissioner Gordon’s daughter, Barbara. Her secret identity was Batgirl and as the Commissioner’s daughter, she had access to all the calls of trouble taking place in Gotham City. Her character, Batgirl, was part of the 1967-68 season, which was the end of the run for the series. After Batman (1966), she also appeared on other television series such as Star Trek (1966) and The Six Million Dollar Man (1974). As her career wound down, Yvonne went into the real estate business. Yvonne Craig died at age 78 of breast cancer at her home in Pacific Palisades, California on August 17, 2015. Minor corner wear, smudging. An exceptionally rare 1950s autograph. This item is in the category “Entertainment Memorabilia\Autographs-Original\Movies\Photographs”. The seller is “pengang” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Object Type: Photograph
  • Industry: Movies

Yvonne Craig Extremely Rare Very Early Original Autographed Photo 1950's Batgirl

24 Gilmore Blu-Green Gasoline Porcelain Enamel Sign. Extremely Rare

24 Gilmore Blu-Green Gasoline Porcelain Enamel Sign. Extremely Rare
24 Gilmore Blu-Green Gasoline Porcelain Enamel Sign. Extremely Rare
24 Gilmore Blu-Green Gasoline Porcelain Enamel Sign. Extremely Rare
24 Gilmore Blu-Green Gasoline Porcelain Enamel Sign. Extremely Rare
24 Gilmore Blu-Green Gasoline Porcelain Enamel Sign. Extremely Rare
24 Gilmore Blu-Green Gasoline Porcelain Enamel Sign. Extremely Rare
24 Gilmore Blu-Green Gasoline Porcelain Enamel Sign. Extremely Rare

24 Gilmore Blu-Green Gasoline Porcelain Enamel Sign. Extremely Rare
There is some sort of paint splatter in places, but the overall condition is very good, with thick bright enamel. This item is in the category “Collectables\Advertising Collectables\Advertising Signs”. The seller is “haylittlelady” and is located in this country: GB. This item can be shipped to United Kingdom, Antigua and Barbuda, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Republic of, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Australia, United States, Bahrain, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, China, Israel, Hong Kong, Norway, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Singapore, Korea, South, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Bangladesh, Belize, Bermuda, Bolivia, Barbados, Brunei Darussalam, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Egypt, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Grenada, French Guiana, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Saint Kitts-Nevis, Saint Lucia, Liechtenstein, Sri Lanka, Macau, Monaco, Maldives, Montserrat, Martinique, Nicaragua, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Turks and Caicos Islands, Aruba, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, Chile, Bahamas, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Kuwait, Panama, Philippines, Qatar, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay.
24 Gilmore Blu-Green Gasoline Porcelain Enamel Sign. Extremely Rare