Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina

Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina
Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina
Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina
Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina
Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina
Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina
Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina
Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina
Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina
Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina

Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina
Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed. The penetrating glass eyes against the aged patina of its intricate carving comes to life as a loyal, noble companion. An unusual feature when examining the neck is what appears to be a snake acting as a collar. Photo #5 shows the artist’s signature in Japanese Syllabary. Measurements: 2 1/8″H x 1 1/4″ widest bottom area. Please Examine Photos Carefully for condition. From the seventeenth through mid-nineteenth century, Japanese citizens of all classes wore the kimono-a simple T-shaped robe constructed with minimal cutting and tailoring-wrapped around the body and held in place with an obi sash. In order to carry small items such as tobacco, medicine, and seals, ingeniously constructed sagemono (a collective term for “hanging things”) were suspended on cords that hung from the obi sash. Stacked, nested containers, known as inro, were specifically designed to hold medicine or seals. Netsuke served as anchors or counterweights for inrô and sagemono. A single cord was threaded through a cord channel on one side of the suspended container, through two holes (himotoshi) in the netsuke, then through the other side of the container, and knotted on the underside of the container. A decorative bead, or ojime, slid along the cord between the netsuke and sagemono, allowing the user to open and close the container. The wearer would slip the netsuke under and dangle it over the obi, allowing the sagemono to hang suspended between waist and hip. In order to access the contents of the sagemono, the wearer slipped the netsuke behind the obi sash, liberating the ensemble. By sliding the ojime toward the netsuke, the contents of the container were easily accessible. Bahamas, Bermuda, Brunei, Darussalam, Cayman Islands, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Ecuador, El Salvador, French Polynesia, Guyana, Honduras, India, Iran, Jamaica, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Maldives, Mauritania, Mauritius, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, New Caledonia, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Saint Kitts-Nevis, Saint Lucia, Samoa, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Wallis and Futuna, Western Sahara, Zimbabwe. This item is in the category “Antiques\Asian Antiques\Japan\Netsuke”. The seller is “kbarbara” and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Primary Material: Wood
  • Age: Unknown
  • Type: Netsuke
  • Original/Reproduction: Antique Original
  • Region of Origin: Japan
  • Color: Brown

Extremely Rare Japanese Carved Wooden Dog Netsuke Artist Signed w Aged Patina